Milwaukee Alderman José G. Pérez Not Addressing Toxic Freshwater Lead Lateral Issue In His District

It seems that Alderman Pérez continues to elude questions about the thousands of toxic freshwater laterals including local restaurants in his own district that could gradually be poisoning some families.

By H. Nelson Goodson
Hispanic News Network U.S.A.

August 25, 2016

Milwaukee, WI – Should Alderman José G. Pérez face a recall election for not taking seriously or responding to questions about the thousands of toxic freshwater home laterals in his own district that could gradually be poisoning some families? Since, it was first exposed by state legislators from the Northside of the city, some aldermen including Pérez have said very little or have not publicly address the issue of lead laterals still connected to many homes in their aldermanic districts. Out of the 15 Aldermanic Districts in the City of Milwaukee, only one is considered without any lead laterals.
One of multiple outspoken critics who have been pushing for the removal of the lead laterals in the city and especially from Milwaukee’s Southside is Robert Miranda, a Lead-free community organizer. According to Miranda, the City wants to only remove part of the lead laterals at their cost, but the other part of the lateral connected to homes, the owners should pay for its replacement, which Miranda says, the City should replace the complete laterals because some home owners might not afford to pay their share to remove the lead laterals.
Miranda has written various letters to Alderman Pérez asking about the 5,585 lead laterals in his district and Miranda shared the latest letter to Alderman Pérez with Hispanic News Network U.S.A. (HNNUSA).

August 25, 2016

Alderman Jose G. Perez
12th Aldermanic District
City Hall
Milwaukee, WI 53201

Ref: Partial Lead Service Line Removal: Building Formally Known As La Perla

Dear Alderman Perez:

I have not received a return phone call from you to inform you of this matter. The pictures attached to this communication is of recent construction that was completed at the building formally known as La Perla Restaurant located in your district.

As you know, this building was recently sold by La Perla owners to new owners who are looking to open a new restaurant at this same building. The construction pictured was done by city work crews who informed me that they completed a partial lead pipe removal. Basically, the city removed it’s portion of lead service pipe connecting to the city water main, leaving the lead pipe on the property owners side intact. This is called partial lead service line removal (PLSLR).

I have expressed to you on several occasions that PLSLR is a practice that is proving to be of detriment to the public health.

In fact, Miguel Del Toral, an EPA water specialist in Chicago, expressed frustration with the lack of information and the prevalence of partial pipe replacements, both required and voluntary. Del Toral says that “In some cases they say they (water utilities) notify the residents, but all they do is notify them that their water is going to be cut off while they replace the lines. There is not any kind of educational material to inform them that their lead levels will go up.”

Numerous studies have expanded scientific knowledge of lead pipe corrosion and revealed that PLSLR to be more hazardous than having lead service lines. PLSLR replacements have been shown to have little lead reduction benefit for affected households and restaurants, and they can cause significant increases in lead levels at the tap that can persist for months or years. Other studies have revealed troubling connections between PLSLR replacements and health harms, including elevated blood lead levels and serious health issues.

In 2011, the EPA asked the agency’s Scientific Advisory Board (“SAB”) to examine the available scientific data regarding the effectiveness of partial replacement, instructing the Board to center its inquiry around five issues: associations between partial replacement and blood lead levels in children; water sampling data at the tap before and after partial replacement; comparisons between partial and full LSL replacements; partial replacement techniques; and the impact of galvanic corrosion.

The SAB submitted its findings in a September 2011 report. Regarding those five issues, the SAB found:

1. As evidenced by blood lead levels in affected children, there was “no demonstrable benefit” in having a partial replacement compared to having an intact LSL, and there is “suggestive evidence of potential harm” from partial replacements.

2. Partial replacements often cause significant increases in water lead levels at the tap for “days to weeks, or even several months,” and there is substantial evidence that the physical disturbance partial replacement entails results in the release of lead particles.

3. While full replacement of LSLs is a generally effective means of reducing lead levels in drinking water, “[partial replacements] have not been shown to be reliably effective” in reducing water lead levels.

4. There is a lack of evidence as to which procedures and techniques might make partial replacement more effective.

5. There is strong evidence that galvanic corrosion (described below) associated with partial replacement poses a risk of increased lead levels in tap water.

Overall, the SAB concluded,

Partial pipe replacements can physically shake loose lead fragments that have built up and laid dormant inside the pipe, pushing them into the water, and spiking the lead levels, even where they previously were not high. In addition, the type of partial replacement that joins old lead pipes to new copper ones, using brass fittings, “spurs galvanic corrosion that can dramatically increase the amount of lead released into drinking water supplies,” according to research from Washington University.

In other words, if the owners of this new restaurant on 5th & National open for business as a restaurant, and if they did not remove the lead service line from their side of the property, more likely than not customers of this restaurant will be exposing their family to lead in their food cooked with this water or drinking lead water from the restaurant tap.

Considering these factors my questions to you are:

1. The Milwaukee Department of Public Works and Milwaukee Water Works announced a moratorium on replacing water mains in January of this year because they found that the work was disturbing lead service lines. Why hasn’t your office called for a moratorium on PLSLR in your district?

2. Have you obtained a guarantee from the new owners of the building formally known as La Perla their commitment to remove the rest of the lead service line from their part of the property?

3. Do you have data showing the number of PLSLR being completed in the 12th Aldermanic District over the past five years?

4. Are you aware of other PLSLR work being conducted in your district currently? If there are any, have you conducted precautionary efforts to inform property owners of the potential health dangers PLSLR represent?

Based on the current scientific data, PLSLR have not been shown to reliably reduce drinking water lead levels in the short term, ranging from days to months, and potentially even longer. Additionally, PLSRL is frequently associated with short-term elevated drinking water lead levels for some period of time after replacement, suggesting the potential for harm, rather than benefit during that time period.

In the interest of public health, I look forward to your response.

Regards,
Robert Miranda
Lead-free water community organizer
Editor, Wisconsin Spanish Journal

cc: Rules & Steering Committee

Update: As of 12:32 p.m. on August 25, 2016 just after the HNNUSA article was posted, an email was sent to Robert Miranda by Sandy Rusch Walton, the Communications Manager for the City of Milwaukee Department of Public Works, Walton wrote, “In response to your question and concern…the property at 734 S. 5th Street, all three of the water service lines servicing the building have been completely replaced – City-owned and privately owned sides.” La Perla building new owners paid to removed three partial lead laterals in the privately owned side, according to Walton.

On Thursday, former Alderman Angel Sánchez released a statement concerning the toxic freshwater lead laterals in the Southside, he questioned why hasn’t the City Health Commissioner began to test adults and children for lead in their system. Sánchez asked, “Why doesn’t the City of Milwaukee Health Department begin testing adults for lead? I continue to remain very concerned about lead in our drinking water and the effects its having on everyone.
The Health Commissioner should respond. Our Alderman (Pérez) has known about this before the election and after, yet remains silent. The public has fallen victim to his sworn oath in placing the people’s interest before his political aspirations.”

Leave a comment

29 Sherman Park Agitators Arrested During Unrest For Sylville Smith’s Homicide Were From Milwaukee Not Chicago

29 suspects arrested and charged during an unrest at the Sherman Park neighborhood shortly after Sylville Smith was fatally gun down by Milwaukee Police Officer Dominique Heaggan were all from Milwaukee and not from Chicago as Milwaukee Police Chief Flynn and Mayor Barrett first reported, according to the Milwaukee County Sheriff’s Office.

By H. Nelson Goodson
Hispanic News Network U.S.A.

August 25, 2016

Milwaukee, WI – On Tuesday, the Milwaukee County Sheriff’s Office (MCSO) confirmed that all the 29 suspects arrested and charged during the Sherman Park neighborhood unrest after the August 13 homicide of Sylville Smith, 23, who was fatally killed by Milwaukee Police Officer Dominique Heaggan, 24, were all from the city of Milwaukee. The MCSO says, the suspects were all from Milwaukee contradicting what Milwaukee Police Chief Edward Flynn and Mayor Tom Barrett stated during a press conference that some of the agitators who started the unrest and rioting at the Sherman Park neighborhood were outsiders, especially from Chicago.
The Milwaukee County Sheriff’s Office released the following statement, the “Riot starters in Sherman Park Ch12 news coverage from Monday, August 15: of Chief Flynn/Mayor Barrett news conference quotes Chief Flynn saying: “We had some folks from Chicago come to town – the Revolutionary Communist Party of Chicago showed up and actually they’re the ones who started causing problems.”
Mayor Barrett said the Sherman Park residents “want their neighborhood back and they want the outsiders who are coming in to their neighborhood to leave. Victims of outside agitators. They’re deliberately trying to damage a great neighborhood and a great city. Residents don’t deserve this and we won’t tolerate it.”
Since the local media didn’t do a Fact Check, you can see the booking photos, charges and city of residence of the 29 arrested during the weekend violence here (they are all from one city… Milwaukee).”
Chief Flynn and Mayor Barrett have not been able to prove that some of the agitators who caused the unrest were from Chicago and no comments have been released by either Chief Flynn or Mayor Barrett.

Leave a comment

Recordando el 46 Aniversario de la Toma de Control de Chapman Hall en la UW-Milwaukee por Latinos

Conmemorando la cronica de los 46 años desde la toma de la Universidad de Wisconsin en Milwaukee en el año 1970 por parte de la comunidad latina.

Por H. Nelson Goodson
Hispanic News Network U.S.A.

22 de agosto del 2016

Milwaukee, Wisconsin – El 27 de agosto, se celebra el 46 aniversario de las protestas y manifestaciones de la comunidad latina por su esfuerzo de la toma de control de Chapman Hall en la Universidad de Wisconsin en Milwaukee (UWM) y estos hechos seran recordados por los familiares sobrevivientes y los que realmente participaron en el evento histórico del año 1970 en la historia de Wisconsin. Al menos 500 personas se unieron al encargo de ponerse de pie y desafiar la política discriminatoria de UWM que impedía a los hispanos y otras minorías de matricularse en la universidad urbana. Cuatro hombres, Jesús Salas, J. Gregorio “Goyo” Rivera, Dante Navarro y José Luis Huerta-Sanchez y una mujer, Marla O. Anderson fueron detenidos por protestar contra la política discriminatoria que mantenía a la mayoría de los latinos sin esperanza de educarse en la UWM. El Canciller de la UWM J. Martin Klotsche se negó varias veces a reunirse con los representantes de la comunidad para resolver la política discriminatoria en una tarde de agosto.La protesta en la UWM comenzó con cerca de 150 personas y en pocos días creció a más de 500 personas. Klotsche se había negado a reunirse con los manifestantes, pero después de cuatro días de huelga de hambre por parte de los organizadores de la protesta, el estancamiento se rompió y Klotsche finalmente se reunió con ellos. En septiembre del 1970, Klotsche se puso de acuerdo y negocio con miembros de la comunidad hispana para crear el Instituto de Habla Español y Extensión (SSOI-Spanish Speaking Outreach Institute) para ofrecer asesoramiento académico, reclutar, mantener y ayudar a los estudiantes potenciales para que continuarán con sus carreras académicas el la universidad. El SSOI y su equipo de consejeros académicos sería especialmente enfocado para prestar servicios de reclutamiento y asegurar que las necesidades de educación de cerca de 30,000 latinos que viven en el área de Milwaukee podrían tener una opción de ingresar a la universidad.
Lo creas o no, la toma de la UWM en 1970 se mantenía en silencio y se había desvanecido en la memoria de los que participaron en ese año y continuaron con sus vidas sin reconocer el éxito de la labor unida por la comunidad latina cual les esperaba 31 años después de su reconocimiento por los logros de poder romper la barreras de la discriminación en esa epoca.
Después de 31 años, volvió a emerger de nuevo cuando el primer artículo detallado sobre la toma de UWM en 1970 fue escrito y publicado en 2001. El siguiente artículo describe verdaderas cuentas de la toma de UWM en 1970 que fue publicado por primera vez en el periódico El Conquistador en 13-19 de junio del 2001, Vol. 4, No. 29 y fue revisada el 24 de agosto de 2001. Hora El Hispanic News Network U.S.A. (HNNUSA) sigue recordando los hechos por nuestra comunidad latina.
En julio del 2001, la Conferencia Anual del Consejo Nacional de La Raza (NCLR) se llevaba a cabo en Milwaukee. Los organizadores de NCLR habían sorprendido con el gran número de voluntarios y organizadores hispanos con educación superior que participaban en la conferencia en comparación con otros estados. Los organizadores de NCLR querían saber cómo lograron los hispanos en Wisconsin de obtener una educación universitaria cuando muchas barreras existían en la década de 1960 hasta principios de 1970, las cuales mantenían a los latinos afuera de las oportunidades de educación superior.
La historia que está a punto de leer es sólo un recuerdo para algunos que vivieron los momentos en 1970, pero para nosotros, las generaciones que siguieron, lo logros en ese año fue un éxito de nuestra comunidad hispana de Milwaukee y Wisconsin por crear un lugar mejor para vivir. Ha llegado el tiempo una vez más para recordar la conmemoración y de nunca olvidar el logro de nuestra comunidad en 1970, es parte de nuestra lucha para lograr éxito, es parte de nuestra historia, educación y cultura en Wisconsin.
La cadena de eventos comenzó el 27 de agosto del 1970, cuando aproximadamente 150 hispanos convergieron en la oficina del excanciller de UWM J. Martin Klotsche para reunirse con él. En el semestre del otoño de 1970, sólo había 14 estudiantes hispanos matriculados en UWM, la mayoría de ellos procedentes del Sur y América Central en comparación con los 25,000 estudiantes anglosajones que asistían a clases en la universidad.
Para la comunidad hispana, “en Milwaukee existían muchas barreras bloqueando su camino a la educación superior. Su lengua y su distinción cultural, fueron mal visto y tenían un acceso limitado a la información sobre las oportunidades de educación y unos modelos de conducta profesional. El trato discriminatorio era la norma”. (Citado de Revista Myriad de UWM 1990, Vol. 1, numero 1)
En 1968 a principios de 1970, los profesores y consejeros académicos en la División Sur de la escuela secundaria (South Division High School) en el lado sur y otras escuelas en el sistema de Escuelas Públicas de Milwaukee (MPS) no practicaban una prioridad para asesorar a los estudiantes latinos acerca de la inscripción a la universidad y las oportunidades educativas disponibles para prepararse para registrarse en la universidad en aquel tiempo. Los consejeros escolares no estaban preparados para manejar una afluencia de habla español cual le afectaba a estudiantes migrantes de Texas, California y otros estados y los estudiantes puertorriqueños que llegaban desde la isla con limitado habla Inglés. La mayoría de estos estudiantes fueron considerados con discapacidades de lenguaje y tratados de manera diferente como personas de incapacidad mental hasta que la comunidad hispana luchó para establecer el programa bilingüe modelo que todavía está en vigor hoy en MPS.
En la década de 1960, administradores de las escuelas públicas de Milwaukee consideraban a los hispanos como una fuente creciente de mano de obra barata y trabajadores con pocas habilidades.
Hasta agosto del 1970 duro cuando se levantó la comunidad para romper esas barreras de discriminación educativa que existía y la limitación del acceso de educación superior y las pocas oportunidades educativas para los latinos. La reforma de la educación superior y el derecho de estudiantes para registrarse en cursos universitarios y ser aceptados comenzaron en 1970, cuando el Consejo de Educación para los latinoamericanos (CELA) organizó las marchas y protestas que provocaron el inicio de una nueva generación de intelectuales hispanos en Wisconsin.
“Venceremos” fue un poderoso grito que se convertiría en un eco que rebotó a través de las paredes en el campo de la UWM. Cuando el canciller Klotsche decidió cancelar una reunión por tercera vez con CELA, el grupo entro a la oficina del canciller exigiendo hablar con el, mientras que su secretaria le preguntó al grupo, “¿Qué estában haciendo en la oficina las personas?”. Algunos de los hispanos se sentaron directamente encima de la mesa del canciller en un gesto que se referían a los negocios en esta ocasión. El grupo en Chapman Hall fue provocado por la cancelación de la esperada junta con el rector. El grupo de hispanos también había querido negociar oportunidades educativas con el canciller.
Sin embargo, el Dr. Ernest Spaights, el Vicedecano de Relaciones Estudiantiles y el Dr. Lynn Elly, Asistente del Canciller de las relaciones de la UWM le dijo al grupo que el Canciller Klotsche estaba fuera de la ciudad y no podría cumplir la junta con ellos ese día. Se esperaría que el canciller podría reunirse con el grupo el próximo lunes de la semana siguiente, pero el grupo hispano en ese momento, dijo, “ya era suficiente” y decidieron que se quedarían en la oficina del Klotsche hasta que se reuniera con ellos. Un miembro del grupo gritó, estamos cansados ​​de esperar a mañana “Nosotros, como latinos nos han ignorado durante mucho tiempo”, respondió Enriqueta González, una maestra del distrito de las Escuelas Públicas de Milwaukee. Se alcanzó un consenso por el grupo que permanecerían hasta que el rector regresara. La oficina del canciller estaba lista para cerrar a las 5:00 de la tarde para ese día y el grupo hispano no se alejaría de la oficina.
La policía de Milwaukee fueron llamados para que alojarán a las personas de la oficina del rector. Los policías llegaron preparados para un motín de antidisturbios y le avisaron a las personas presente quitarse sus cosas de valor porque los iban a detener a todos ellos. Las personas también fueron amenazadas por algunos de los funcionarios de la UWM y otros anglosajones que las fotos tomadas de ellos serían utilizadas por el Servicio de Naturalización de Inmigración de deportación … ellos intentaban “que iban a tratar de asustarnos para dispersar algunos de los manifestantes”, de acuerdo con Arnoldo Sevilla, que en ese momento el era un inmigrante indocumentado, pero años después logró estatus legal en E.E.U.U.
Entonces la Policía de Milwaukee y la Policía de UWM empezaron a rodear al grupo en la oficina del rector y haciendo un círculo pequeño y más pequeño dejando pocas personas cerca de la puerta y por último, un detective señaló a cinco hispanos que quedaban en la oficina y fueron puestos bajo custodia.
Una de esas personas fue Marla O. Anderson, una madre de seis hijos/as; Dante Navarro, candidato a la Asamblea del Estado Distrito 12 en ese año; Gregorio J. “Goyo” Rivera, activista de la comunidad; Jesús Salas, uno de los líderes de la protesta y un estudiante de UWM; y José Luis Huerta-Sánchez, estudiante, de acuerdo con el informe de arresto de la Policía de UWM registrada el viernes, 28 de agosto de 1970.
Más tarde, como a las 11:00 de la noche fueron puestos en libertad por el entonces abogado de la ciudad de Milwaukee William Gardner, que no encontró motivo para poner cargos de desorden civil. Navarro dijo, “que en realidad nos liberan de la cárcel de la ciudad de Milwaukee alrededor de las 11:00 de la noche porque sabían que alrededor de 500 personas se habían reunido en UWM y no querían un motín para encender. La policía nunca nos informó antes de nuestra liberación que un gran número de personas se había unido en el campo de UWM”. Mientras se llevaron a los cinco manifestantes detenidos, cientos de manifestantes comenzaron a reunirse en el campo de universidad por mensaje enviado de boca en boca sobre la noticia de la manifestación. Navarro recordó cuando fueron liberados, algunos de ellos pensaban regresar a casa. Se detuvieron por un momento y Marla O. Anderson y Jesús Salas ayudaron a animar a los demás para volver a UWM, apesar de que estaban esperando todo los manifestantes se había regresado a la comunidad. Pero ellos querían terminar lo que habían empezado.
Para su sorpresa, unos 500 manifestantes se mantuvieron y ya estaban pasando la noche en los jardines por la UWM y afuera de la oficina del rector. Navarro dice, cuando vio a todas aquellas personas, desgarro gotas de lagrimas formadas en sus ojos y se sintió tan orgulloso de ver todas esas personas afuera de la oficina del Klotsche. El apoyo y la bienvenida que recibieron de los manifestantes les hizo sentir que sus detenciones no fueron infructuosos, dijo Navarro.
Alguien de la oficina del canciller pidió a Salas, si podía decirle a la gente a salir de las instalaciones. Salas se puso encima de un vehículo y le dijo a la gente lo que había solicitado el portavoz de la oficina del canciller. Las personas se negaron a abandonar el lugar, según Navarro. Al día siguiente, el canciller Klotsche una vez más, dijo, que no se reuniría con ellos hasta el lunes. El grupo había querido reunirse con la Canciller Klotsche para introducir una propuesta de 11 puntos para un Instituto de Habla Español y de Extensión.
Pero Klotsche se negó para reunirse con ellos y su acción encendió una serie de marchas en todo el campo de la universidad. Los manifestantes comenzaron a cantar en armonía “Venceremos, Venceremos” y las palabras hicieron eco en toda la UWM. Los manifestantes cantaron varias canciones en español, mientras que otros tocaban sus guitarras, lo que aumentó el orgullo para todos.
“Ellos marcharon y cantaron de 8:00 de la mañana hasta horas de la noche sin siquiera tomar un descanso para comer. Algunos podrían soportar el hambre en lugar de darse por vencido y que terminaron en la puerta delantera de la casa del canciller Klotsche cantando Venceremos”, dijo Enriqueta González en un entrevista en el año 1985.
A continuación, los manifestantes comenzaron las sentadas en la hierba y asistieron a una vigilia de apoyo religioso en Chapman Hall, donde se encuentra la oficina del Canciller Klotsche.
Al día siguiente, cual era el viernes como a las 11:00 de la mañana, una misa se ​​llevó a cabo por el Padre John Maurice, del Centro Español para aquellos que habían pasado la noche en Chapman Hall. Después de la misa, el grupo decidió ir adelante y tratar de inscribirse en las clases en UWM. El grupo integrado por los hispanos de todas las edades se dirigió a la oficina de los registradores y cuando los administradores de UWM preguntaron qué querían, el grupo solo respondió en español. El grupo decía: “Queremos matricularnos en el colegio, Porque No nos dejan registrarnos … Nosotros tambien pagamos Impuestos”. Los trabajadores administrativos no podían entenderlos y 18 estudiantes anglosajones que trabajaban en la oficina de los registradores decidieron salir de sus puestos de trabajo en la simpatía y en apoyo a los manifestantes. La acción fue para confirmar que no había ninguna persona trabajando en UWM que podría hablan español.
Otros 60 hispanos fueron a la biblioteca de UWM para buscar libros en español. Sólo encontraron algunos de ellos en la biblioteca.
Jesús Salas en una entrevista en el año 2002 dijo, el punto de inflexión del movimiento educativo de UWM se produjo cuando se realizó una huelga de hambre frente a la oficina del Klotsche y los guardias de seguridad comenzaron a confiar en nosotros. Cuando Salas se le permitió entrar a Chapman Hall para usar el baño, él y un hombre no identificado cerraron las puertas dejando a los guardias de seguridad en el exterior.
Una vez adentro, Salas comenzó a hacer llamadas telefónicas a otros organizadores para hacerles saber que habían hecho cargo de las oficinas de Klotsche de nuevo. Salas dejo a más gente entrar a la oficina del Klotsche a través de las puertas traseras.
Los días pasaban, Salas y otros comenzaron a exigir al rector que se permita a los miembros de la comunidad para servir en un comité asesor en la selección del nuevo director en una propuesta para crear un Instituto de Habla Español y Extensión en UWM y el Canciller Klotsche lo ignoraba. Los cuatro días de manifestaciones y sentadas en la universidad resultó que Klotsche concediera y poco después se seleccionó un grupo de cinco hispanos para reunirse con él.
Klotsche acepto un grupo de representantes de UWM que fueran posteriormente a la comunidad hispana para tratar de reclutar estudiantes a la universidad. Canciller Klotsche también nombró a un asistente especial para coordinar los programas para la comunidad de habla español. Las puertas de la educación superior fueron finalmente abiertas para la comunidad hispana.
El 17 de septiembre, el grupo de la canciller pasó largas horas en la oficina de United Migrant Opportunity Services (UMOS) para ayudar aquellas personas que estaban interesadas ​​en seguir una educación superior para inscribirse en la UWM. Armando Orellana, el líder del CELA pidió una declaración escrita de la posición de UWM sobre todas las solicitudes de CELA, pero no sería presentada ninguna declaración por Klotsche.
Fue hasta el 12 de Octubre del 1970 después de unos días de huelga de hambre en las afueras de la oficina del rector cuando el rector concedió y se puso de acuerdo el 31 de Octubre para trabajar junto con los líderes de la manifestación cual incluye a Salas, Orellana, Hernández y otras personas.
Sin embargo, UWM finalmente creó el SSOI para atender a cerca de 30,000 hispanos que viven en el área de Milwaukee en 1970. El Dr. Ricardo Fernández quien también participó en las protestas más tarde se convirtió como el primer director de SSOI. El resultado de las manifestaciones se convirtió finalmente en una realidad y por primera ves se les permitiría a 85 estudiantes para inscribirse en el primer semestre. El acuerdo fue, se permitiría a 10 estudiantes con un grado de cuatro años para obtener una maestría; 25 estudiantes que no habían terminado con su licenciatura, pero estaban haciendo un trabajo profesional para la comunidad también fueron aceptados; y 50 estudiantes que han terminado la escuela secundaria, pero que necesitan ayuda para prepararse para la universidad fueron aceptados como estudiantes especiales. Tambien, estudiantes hispanos en las escuelas secundarias podrían tomar cursos con crédito el la UWM en su último año en la escuela publica pero con el acuerdo que después de sus graduación se registrarán y continuarán a la UWM.
González, quien trabajo 20 años con MPS, durante una entrevista sonrió y dijo, “ellos también aceptaron una gran cantidad de hispanos e incluso aquellos que no tenía ni siquiera una diploma de preparatoria, con la condición de que obtendrían un GED o un diploma de la escuela más tarde. Muchos estudiantes se aprovecharon de la oferta y muchos de nosotros eran parejas casadas. Algunos de los que UWM acepto fueron a Marla O. Anderson, Gloria González, Gregorio Montoto, Dante Navarro, Tommy Rodríguez, Carlos Sevilla, Arnoldo Sevilla y otros. Incluso Montoto quien trabajaba para SSOI fue a la South Division High School y reclutó a los estudiantes para la oficina de extensión de SSOI situada en la S. 5th St. y W . Nacional Ave., al lado del periodico La Guardia. Al principio no nos aceptaban porque no podíamos pasar sus pruebas de admisión y ahora nos querían sin diplomas “, explicó González.
También González recuerda que, Marla O. Anderson era tan feliz y orgullosa de que ella era la única mujer detenida con los hombres. En 1996, el SSOI recibió el nombre de Roberto Hernández Center. Hernández fue uno de los líderes instrumentales como Ernesto Chacon y Salvador Sanchez de las protestas de UWM en 1970.
En el semestre de primavera de 2001, alrededor de 900 estudiantes hispanos se inscribieron en UWM, en comparación con una matrícula estudiantil de 23,000. En el semestre de otoño del 1970, sólo 14 estudiantes hispanos estaban registrados en la UWM y el otoño del 1973 hubo un aumento del 300% de los estudiantes hispanos registrados. Desde la década de 1980, alrededor de 475 a 580 estudiantes latinos se inscribirían por semestre. Hoy en día, entre 1,000 y 1,500 estudiantes hispanos se siguen inscribiendo por semestre en UWM.
La lucha para una educación superior en la UWM en el 1970, logró la oportunidad para cualquier persona interesada hoy en día para continuar su educación superior en cualquier universidad, colegio y colegio técnico sin ser rechazado/a en Wisconsin. Las puertas para la educación superior en Wisconsin siguen abiertas gracias a nuestra gente que lucho para nuestro futuro.
El logro de nuestra comunidad latina en Wisconsin inspiró a los estudiantes en Illinois que también lucharán para su educación superior en el 1970.

Especialmente para los líderes y activistas quienes lucharon para nuestra educación superior y siguen en nuestros recuerdos y deseándole a los siguientes en la lista de honor que descansen en paz.

• Juan V. Alvarez
• Marla O. Anderson
• Manuel Ayala
• Miguel Berry
• Danny Campos
• Raul Cano
• Camila Casarez
• Alfonso Flores
• Raul Flores
• Enriqueta Gonzalez
• Gloria Gonzalez
• Irma Guerra
• Loyd J. Guzior
• Roberto Hernández
• Pantaleon Hill
• Manuela Hill
• Mary Lou Massignani
• Mary Ann McNulty
• Genevieve Medina
• Julia Mendoza
• Dante Navarro
• Maria Ortega
• Juanita Renteria
• Francisco “Panchillo” Rodriguez
• T. Carlos “Charlie” Salas
• Dorothy Torres
• Luis Torres

Video de la toma de control de Chapman Hall de la UW-Milwaukee en el año 1970 https://youtu.be/FzOpOxI_GKw

Leave a comment

46th Anniversary Of The UW-Milwaukee Chapman Hall Takeover By Latinos Seeking Equality To Higher Education

This year marks the 46th Anniversary that the Hispanic community struggled to gain equal access to higher education by staging protests and taking over Chapman Hall in 1970.

By H. Nelson Goodson
August 21, 2016

Milwaukee, WI – On Saturday, August 27th, the Milwaukee Hispanic community once again will commemorate its 46th Anniversary for the struggle to provide equal access to higher education for generations of Hispanic students in the State of Wisconsin. On August 27, 1970, the Hispanic community took over Chapman Hall at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) after a discriminatory policy was in place to keep Hispanics from enrolling at UWM. In the Fall semester of 1970, there were only 14 Hispanic students enrolled at UWM, most of them from South and Central America compared to 25,000 students attending classes.
For the Hispanic community, “In Milwaukee many barriers existed blocking their paths to higher education. Their language and cultural distinctness were frowned upon, and they had limited access to information about educational opportunities and few professional role models. Discriminatory treatment was the norm.” (Cited from Myriad Magazine UWM 1990, Volume 1 Number 1)
At least 500 people took it upon themselves to stand up and challenge the UWM discriminatory policy that prevented Hispanics and other minorities from enrolling at the urban university. Four men, Jesus Salas, Gregorio J. “Goyo” Rivera, Dante Navarro and Jose Luis Huerta-Sanchez and one woman, Marla O. Anderson were taken into custody for protesting the discriminatory policy that kept Latinos from enrolling at UWM and for refusing to leave UWM Chancellor J. Martin Klotsche’s office on that August afternoon. The UWM protest began with about 150 people and within days, it grew to more than 500 people.
Klotsche refused to meet with the protesters, but after three days of hunger strikes by the protest organizers, the stalemate broke and Klotsche finally met with them.
By September 1970, UWM along with members of the Hispanic community created the Spanish Speaking Outreach Institute (SSOI) to offer academic counseling, recruit and retain potential students. The SSOI would especially serve nearly 30,000 Latinos living in the Milwaukee area in 1970.
Believe it or not, the 1970 takeover of UWM quietly faded away in the memories of those who participated and went on with their lives. After 31 years, it resurfaced again when the first comprehensive article by H. Nelson Goodson detailing the accounts was written and published in 2001.
In 1996, the SSOI was renamed the Roberto Hernandez Center. Hernandez was one of the instrumental leaders of the UWM protests in 1970.
Today, a collaborative joint effort by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee School of Engineering, Artworks for Milwaukee and local artist Raoul Deal are completing a mural project to depict the history of UMOS and Latinos in Milwaukee. In recognition and honoring the Latino community activism in Milwaukee, local high school interns including university students and lead artist Deal will unveil a mural in late September 2016 about the 50-year history of United Migrant Opportunity Services (UMOS), which includes a portion of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Chapman Hall Takeover in 1970 by Latinos.
The UMOS 90 foot long X 10 foot high mural will be placed at the Butters-Fetting building on S. 1st Street, S. Kinnickinnic Ave. and W. Historic Mitchell Street in late September, according to artist Deal. The the UMOS mural depicts a series of themes that includes the struggle for farm workers and migrant rights, work opportunities, family, education, culture and the civil rights movement by Latinos in Wisconsin.

In loving Memory and Special Tribute our dearly departed leaders and community founders/activists

• Juan V. Alvarez
• Marla O. Anderson
• Manuel Ayala
• Miguel Berry
• Danny Campos
• Raul Cano
• Camila Casarez
• Alfonso Flores
• Raul Flores
• Enriqueta Gonzalez
• Gloria Gonzalez
• Irma Guerra
• Loyd J. Guzior
• Roberto Hernández
• Pantaleon Hill
• Manuela Hill
• Mary Lou Massignani
• Mary Ann McNulty
• Genevieve Medina
• Julia Mendoza
• Dante Navarro
• Maria Ortega
• Juanita Renteria
• Francisco “Panchillo” Rodriguez
• T. Carlos “Charlie” Salas
• Dorothy Torres
• Luis Torres

46th Anniversary: On August 27, 1970, Latinos fought for equal access to higher education in Wisconsin and succeeded. Documentary video of their testimony and interviews: https://youtu.be/FzOpOxI_GKw

For full historical article: Revisiting The 1970 Hispanic Takeover At UW-Milwaukee Demanding Equal Access To Education http://goo.gl/qOEF5I

Leave a comment

Dale Folley Charged With Arson For Vehicle Set On Fire At Southside Pick’n Save

19-year-old suspect wanted to burn vehicles in the Southside of Milwaukee like Sherman Park over the shooting death of Sylville Smith by Police Officer Dominique Heaggan.

By H. Nelson Goodson
Hispanic News Network U.S.A.

August 20, 2016

Milwaukee, WI – On Saturday, Dale L. Folley, 19, was charged with one felony count for arson of property other than a building, including party to a crime and two misdemeanor counts for bail jumping in connection with the August 14 arson fire of a vehicle at the 1800 block of W. National Ave. If convicted, Folley is facing up to 3 years and six months in prison for the felony count and up to one year in prison on each misdemeanor count. A $7,000 cash bond was set for Folley.
Foley told police that he and others wanted to start burning vehicles like in Sherman Park during the unrest in Milwaukee over the shooting death of Sylville Smith, 23, by Milwaukee Police Officer Dominique Heaggan, 24, over the weekend.
A police officer spotted Folley running near the area of Pick’n Save parking lot on W. National Ave. after another officer reported a suspicious Afro-American male that yelled profanities at him as he investigated a burning vehicle at the Pick’n Save lot. Folley confessed to police that he broke the window of the van and set the it on fire and did indicate that other accomplices were with him at the time he committed the crime.
Folley has several other misdemeanor cases pending for disorderly conduct and retail theft, according to court records.

Leave a comment

Possible Witness In The Sylville Smith Homicide In Milwaukee

A possible witness posted on Facebook that he saw Smith run and shot in the back.

By H. Nelson Goodson
Hispanic News Network U.S.A.

August 20, 2016

Milwaukee, WI – The Sylville Smith, 24, homicide case over the weekend could bring new light to what actually happened in contrary to what the Milwaukee Police Department has said about the shooting death involving Officer Dominique Heaggan. According to a development in the homicide case related to Smith’s death, a possible witness could shed information to what actually happened when Officer Heaggan stopped Smith and another individual on Saturday. The possible witness, TDW (only identified by initials) posted on Facebook, that he saw Smith run and get shot in the back in contrary to Milwaukee Police Chief Edward Flynn’s statement that Smith was shot in the chest and arm. The Milwaukee Medical Examiner’s Office (MMEO) released information to media that the autopsy showed Smith was shot in the chest and right arm. The MMEO filed the Smith case as a homicide.
A body cam video footage and squad car dash cam video of Smith’s death has not been released by the Milwaukee Police Department (MPD) and the Wisconsin Department of Justice (WI DOJ) who has taken over the investigation. The ACLU-Milwaukee and Wisconsin Jobs have called for the MPD and WI DOJ to released the video.
The possible witness has disabled his FB account where the post appeared, but has a second account that is active. The Smith family is asking for the possible witness to come forward. The witness got of the bus at the time when Smith was stopped, saw him run and then was fatally shot by Officer Heaggan, according to his FB post.
The Wisconsin Department of Justice is also asking for anyone who has information regarding the Smith homicide case to contact them.

Sylville Smith funeral services is set for August 26, 2016 at the Christian Faith Fellowship Church, 8633 W. Good Hope Rd. from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. following funeral in Milwaukee, WI. Eulogy by Rev. Jesse L. Jackson

Leave a comment

Siblings Felt Threaten When Milwaukee Police Officer Dominique Heaggan Approached Them

When siblings went to file a complaint against Milwaukee Police Officer Dominique Heaggan for questionable behavior, an officer in charge at the Milwaukee Police 7 District Station wouldn’t take the complaint and told them the officer’s actions were normal on the field.

By H. Nelson Goodson
August 19, 2016

Milwaukee, WI – On Tuesday, Latoya Brown, a business owner on N. Teutonia Ave. posted on her Facebook account of a disturbing and harassing encounter with Milwaukee Police Officer Dominique Heaggan, 24, on July 12 after seeing that the officer was involved in the fatal shooting death of Sylville Smith, 23, over the weekend. According to Brown, she and her brother had just arrived at a home where they resided for over 30 years from a restaurant and got out of their vehicle when they encountered Officer Heaggan.
Brown stated, while taking their food out of the vehicle that all of a sudden Officer Heaggan appeared in a police bicycle and asked them “What’s up” while he was “grabbing” his side weapon. Brown who says they not friends with Officer Heaggan asked the officer why they were stopped or approached by him and the officer wouldn’t answer. Officer Heaggan never unholstered his weapon, but Brown and her brother felt harassed and afraid that they were going to become victims.
After Officer Heaggan left, both Brown and her brother went to the Milwaukee Police 7 District Station to file a complaint with the commanding captain in charge around 7:00 p.m., but he wasn’t available, according to the police station’s receptionist. A supervisor in charged talked to Brown and her brother, but Brown says, the officer in charge wouldn’t take the complaint and told them that it was normal for the officer to act the way he did.
The officer in charge or receptionist didn’t even adviced Brown that they could file a complaint with the Fire and Police Commission. When Brown was speaking to the officer in charge, Officer Heaggan walked into the area where they were and didn’t look to happy that they were there to complain.
It’s unfortunate that law-abiding citizens including a local business owner were not allowed to file a complaint nor did the officer in charge take any information to contact Brown, if needed. How many citizens have the Milwaukee Police 7 District Station have been turned away to keep them from filing complaints about their officers?

Here’s Latoya Brown’s Facebook posting, “So as I sat here reading and looking at the pics of this young officer who killed this young man on auer it’s has come to my recollection that this is the same officer who harassed myself n my brother wesley brown sitting in front of our grandmother’s home 2 weeks ago we had just come from eating at bw3 and pulled up to my grandmother home who’s resided there over 30+ years as we proceed to grab our food to get out of the vehicle this officer who killed this young man approach us on bike n said what’s up ? Myself n my brother were shocked for many different reasons for one we were not his friends so his approach what’s up was very unprofessional we began to say what’s up with what ? Then he asked do yall live here ? (While grabbing his gun ) we stated yes at that point we were furious because we have resided at that same address since we were born and never had a problem like this we than went to speak to the captain as we walked in the receptionist at the 7th district asked what was our concern we explain to her our issue and she discribe this officer to a t without us even known his name at the time the officer in charge came and spoke with us and felt as if everything the officer did was ok as we were speaking with the officer in charge the officer came from the back looked at myself and my brother n smerked i am heartbroken right now because his actions on that day that me n my brother had to experience was God awful I was so scared for my brother because we were Goin to be his next victim I pray to God this man gets what he deserves #we are the voice #”

Facebook posting of encounter with Milwaukee Police Officer Dominique Heaggan http://bit.ly/2bDmp1H

Leave a comment

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.