School Districts Should Be Held Accountable For Failing To Safely Secure Schools Even On Election Day

Election Day voting polls at public schools with multiple wards in Milwaukee and around the state of Wisconsin allow easy access into schools without safe guards in place to prevent carnage.

February 21, 2018

Interesting how the outcry on school massacres is silent on the issue for safe and secured schools. People seem to be advocating for gun control instead of mandatory safe and secure schools. Recently, one male student in Ohio took a gun to school and shot himself.
Many schools continue to have easy access for anyone or crazies to easily walk in and commit carnage.
Time to take action against school districts who fail to provide mandatory safe and secure schools. Families of injured and deceased victims of school mass shootings should file a class action lawsuit against school districts that fail to provide a safe and secure school. Most school districts around the U.S. have known that crazies have committed carnage at gun free zones that include schools and yet most have failed to safely secure their schools to prevent mass murder.
Another example: On election day, voters have noticed that voting poll locations at public schools that includes multiple wards are open to the public and have easy access into schools without any safe guards in place to assure crazies don’t easily enter to commit carnage.

Source: Hispanic News Network U.S.A.

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Milwaukee County Executive Power Grab State Senate Bill 777 Pulled From Committee Hearing

SB 777 relates to: increasing the authority of a county executive from a populous county and other counties and reducing the authority of a county board, budgeting procedures for populous counties, certain other counties, and cities, villages, and towns, and the method for establishing the compensation of county supervisors and county elective officers.

February 20, 2018

Madison, WI – On Tuesday, Wisconsin State Senator Duey Stroebel (R) the Chair of the Committee on Government Operations, Technology and Consumer Protection pulled Senate Bill 777 (the Milwaukee County Exec takeover SB 777 bill is similar to Assembly Bill 923) from the committee hearing for Wednesday, February 21, 2018.

Public outcry against SB 777 and opposing Chris Abele, the Milwaukee County Executive’s attempt for a none Democratic power grab is a victory for democratic control of Milwaukee County’s future.

The SB 777 was introduced by State Senator Van H. Wanggaard (R) and State Senator Lena C. Taylor (D).

Source: WI State Senator Chris Larson (D) and Hispanic News Network U.S.A.

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Norteño/Tejano Singer Michael Salgado Hospitalized After Suffering From A Stroke

Salgado canceled a performance at the Conway Dance Hall in Texas due to suffering a stroke.

By H. Nelson Goodson
Hispanic News Network U.S.A.

February 19, 2018

New Braunfels, Texas – On Sunday, Michael Salgado, 46, a Norteño/Tejano singer and accordion player announced in a Facebook video that he had canceled a performance at the Conway’s Dance Hall in New Braunfels on Saturday after suffering from a mild stroke. Salgado confirmed that he suffered from a stroke and was hospitalized. He is originally from Barrancas, Chihuahua, Mexico.
Salgado will remain in the hospital until Tuesday after results from an MRI had confirmed that he had suffered a mild stroke. Doctors are trying to determine what caused the stroke, according to Salgado. If he gets released from the hospital on Tuesday, he will perform on Thursday and the weekend at scheduled events.

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National LULAC President Roger C. Rocha’s Corruption Of Principle Reign Exposed By Presidential Candidate Darryl Morin

Morin, a candidate for National LULAC President in 2018 exposed the “Corruption of Principle” reign by current disgraced National LULAC President Roger C. Rocha Jr. and his supporters within the organization.

By H. Nelson Goodson
Hispanic News Network U.S.A.

February 18, 2018

Milwaukee, Wisconsin – On Sunday, Darryl Morin, a former National LULAC Vice-president of the Midwest posted a Facebook video on his account that explained what actually happened in Washington, D.C. when the LULAC National Board met, the resignation of Brent Wilkes, the CEO of the National League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) and Morin also confirmed the “Corruption of Principle” by Rocha and his followers. Rocha has agreed to rescind the restraining order as long as the National Board backed away from removing him and let him serve his full term, including for Joe Henry, the National LULAC Vice-president of the Midwest to stop writing negative articles about Rocha. Rocha has endorsed Domingo Garcia, a Dallas, Texas attorney for National LULAC President, according to Morin. If Garcia is elected in July during the annual National Convention, he will definitely follow the long line of those elected before him that no outsider from Texas will get elected as LULAC National President confirming the long standing corruption within the National LULAC.
Garcia’s supporters have threaten Morin including other members at the National level and indicated for him to pull out from the race as the next president at the National LULAC. Morin confirmed that he is a candidate for president of the National LULAC and believes Rocha should be removed or impeached.
Last Friday, Wilkes resigned after Roger C. Rocha Jr., the LULAC National President refused to resigned and filed a civil lawsuit seeking a restraining order in Bexar County, Texas to keep the LULAC National Executive Committee Board from ousting him from office. A judge in Bexar County granted Rocha a restraining order on Thursday and a hearing for a continued restraining order is scheduled for February 28.
At the National Board meeting on Saturday, the LULAC National Board of Directors adopted a motion of no confidence against Roger Rocha, Jr., its National President. The Board further confirmed that the National Board of Directors would continue to perform its duties of advocating and fighting for our community.
LULAC released the following press release on Friday, that LULAC National Board convened in Washington, D.C. to address recent public concerns regarding the organization’s leadership and assess the necessary next steps. Roger C. Rocha, Jr. announced his intent to serve out his term until the national elections take place on Saturday, July 21, 2018 at the Annual LULAC National Convention & Exposition in Phoenix, Arizona. Mr. Rocha does not plan to run for a final term. In the meantime, the National Board, on behalf of the National Assembly, will continue to perform it’s duties.
LULAC National Chief Executive Officer Brent Wilkes resigned, but also restated that he will help LULAC with the transition as he exits out of the organization. Mr. Wilkes has served the organization for 30 years, advocating on behalf of Latino civil rights, voting rights, immigration, education, health care, the environment and more. Under his longtime leadership, LULAC has become one of the most respected voices on Latino civil rights issues.
On February 4, the NECB decided to stripped Rocha from his administrative duties and cut off his stipend. Rocha lost his authority and privilege to return to his administrative office, since the locks were changed and Wilkes too over until a new president is selected.
The Texas State LULAC Board also held an emergency conference call on February 4 and sent a letter to Rocha requesting his resignation “for the good and welfare of the League.” The Texas LULAC also stated that it stands with the National LULAC Clean DREAM Act platform and stands against Rocha’s letter to Trump supporting his immigration reform plan.
Rocha had sent his support to Trump by using an outdated LULAC National letter head, which drew condemnation from the Texas LULAC including numerous other LULAC Councils from throughout the U.S.
Rocha was forced to retracted the letter sent to Trump. He attempted to explain that it was a personal letter to the president, but the letter was leaked out by the main stream media. U.S. Majority Senate leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) even used Rocha’s letter to show support for Trump’s immigration reform plan after the government shutdown, which was in contrary with the National LULAC mandate to support a Clean DREAM Act.
In 2015, Rocha was elected National LULAC President, but the year before in New York during the 85th National Convention, the elections were cancelled to prevent any candidate other than from Texas to be elected as president. In LULAC’s 89th history, no president from any other state or Puerto Rico other than from Texas have been elected as president to the National LULAC.
In brief: Luis Roberto Verá Jr. who was the election judge at the 85th National LULAC Convention in 2014 decided along with former termed-out National LULAC President Margaret Moran to cancel the elections because Rocha who was running for president in 2014 might not win. It was the first time, that a LULAC National Convention was ever canceled in 85 years. Verá argued that the elections were canceled because of a filed TRO in New York.
Verá was also the election judge at the Salt Lake City 86th National LULAC Convention as well. Verá should have recused himself for conflict of interest from the election, since Rocha was running again. Rocha, Verá and Moran had very close working ties.
Rocha received 385 votes and Magdalena “Maggie” Rivera from Illinois received 160 votes in 2015. In 2014, Rivera was elected President by the membership in NY, but Moran, Verá and Wilkes failed to recognize her election to office. Two lawsuits were filed in Texas and New York pertaining to 2014 elections. Apparently, Moran illegally stayed in office for a fifth term to prevent an outsider other than a candidate from Texas to take office as president of the National LULAC.
Rocha’s term will expire in July, if he remains in office. A National LULAC president can only run and get elected to four terms, according to its organization’s Constitution and by-laws.
Morin from Wisconsin was the LULAC National Vice-president of the Midwest in 2014 and is currently a candidate for president of the National LULAC, but if the National LULAC keeps its tradition from electing candidates from other states other than from Texas, Morin or any other candidate outside of Texas will probably face opposition from corrupt LULAC members in Texas. Morin in 2014 resigned shortly after the cancelation of the annual elections in NYC, but later recinded his resignation after Moran convinced Morin to stay on to support her administration for a 5th term as LULAC president.
In 2013, Garcia was was ousted from elections in the Las Vegas 84th Annual National LULAC Convention. Moran was running for a fourth term as National President and allegations were brought up that Garcia had not served as a member for three consecutive years to qualify him to run for the National president’s position and that his LULAC Council 102’s membership dues were paid in 2012, which Garcia claimed that the Council’s paid dues were applied for the year 2013 to keep him from challenging Moran at the time.
In brief: An unprecedented election was held in 2013 by members of LULAC before the actual presidential election. An estimated 2,000 LULAC members attended the event. The first election process drew controversy and a decision by less than 2/3 voting membership was made to disqualify Moran’s main opponent Domingo Garcia from Dallas, TX. Garcia needed at least 2/3 of the membership vote to challenge and stay in the presidential elections.
Apparently, Garcia did not serve as a full member for three consecutive years as required to run for president, according to LULAC’s legal advisory board decision. 
LULAC in March 2013 filed a lawsuit in Dallas in an attempt to keep Garcia, a former Texas State Representative and Dallas mayor pro-temp from seeking LULAC’s presidency. LULAC claimed, Garcia didn’t pay his LULAC Council 102’s membership dues in 2012. Garcia, who has a lifetime membership claims, Council 102 attempted to pay the dues in September and December in 2012, but LULAC applied it to their dues for 2013.
Garcia filed a counter lawsuit in April 2013 claiming the LULAC Board rewrote rules to technically prevent him from running for president and that the 2012 dues “payment was manipulated by incumbents and applied to 2013,” according to Garcia’s Facebook posting of Dallas News dot com article about the lawsuits.
In May 2013, a Dallas County judge denied Garcia a temporary or permanent injunction to keep LULAC from keeping him off the ballot for president. The judge cited that the organization had a Board to resolve their own issues, membership was voluntary and members were expected to follow set rules.
At least 100 of Garcia’s young supporters from the Phoenix, Arizona area and Texas were stripped from their right to cast a vote at the convention, even though they were in good standing with LULAC. Because their candidate Garcia was disqualified. With Garcia ousted, Moran easily won re-election. 
Garcia and other LULAC members at the convention alleged dirty politics and Moran’s supporters of suppressing the membership vote from those who have paid their dues. 

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Brent Wilkes, CEO of National LULAC Resigns And Roger C. Rocha Jr., National LULAC President Gets Temporary Restraining Order To Prevent From Getting Ousted 

Wilkes resigned as CEO of the National LULAC after Rocha, the LULAC National President refused to resign and filed a civil lawsuit in Texas to prevent the National LULAC Executive Committee Board from ousting him from office.

By H. Nelson Goodson
Hispanic News Network U.S.A.

February 17, 2018

Washington, D.C. – On Friday, Brent Wilkes, the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the National League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) resigned after Roger C. Rocha Jr., the LULAC National President refused to resigned and filed a civil lawsuit seeking a restraining order in Bexar County, Texas to keep the LULAC National Executive Committee Board from ousting him from office. A judge in Bexar County granted Rocha a restraining order on Thursday and a hearing for a continued restraining order is scheduled for February 28.
At the National Board meeting on Saturday, the LULAC National Board of Directors adopted a motion of no confidence against Roger Rocha, Jr., its National President. The Board further confirmed that the National Board of Directors would continue to perform its duties of advocating and fighting for our community.t
LULAC released the following press release on Friday, that LULAC National Board convened in Washington, D.C. to address recent public concerns regarding the organization’s leadership and assess the necessary next steps. Roger C. Rocha, Jr. announced his intent to serve out his term until the national elections take place on Saturday, July 21, 2018 at the Annual LULAC National Convention & Exposition in Phoenix, Arizona. Mr. Rocha does not plan to run for a final term. In the meantime, the National Board, on behalf of the National Assembly, will continue to perform it’s duties.
LULAC National Chief Executive Officer Brent Wilkes resigned, but also restated that he will help LULAC with the transition as he exits out of the organization. Mr. Wilkes has served the organization for 30 years, advocating on behalf of Latino civil rights, voting rights, immigration, education, health care, the environment and more. Under his longtime leadership, LULAC has become one of the most respected voices on Latino civil rights issues.
On February 4, the NECB decided to stripped Rocha from his administrative duties and cut off his stipend. Rocha lost his authority and privilege to return to his administrative office, since the locks were changed and Wilkes too over until a new president is selected.
The Texas State LULAC Board also held an emergency conference call on February 4 and sent a letter to Rocha requesting his resignation “for the good and welfare of the League.” The Texas LULAC also stated that it stands with the National LULAC Clean DREAM Act platform and stands against Rocha’s letter to Trump supporting his immigration reform plan.
Rocha had sent his support to Trump by using an outdated LULAC National letter head, which drew condemnation from the Texas LULAC including numerous other LULAC Councils from throughout the U.S.
Rocha was forced to retracted the letter sent to Trump. He attempted to explain that it was a personal letter to the president, but the letter was leaked out by the main stream media. U.S. Majority Senate leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) even used Rocha’s letter to show support for Trump’s immigration reform plan after the government shutdown, which was in contrary with the National LULAC mandate to support a Clean DREAM Act.
In 2015, Rocha was elected National LULAC President, but the year before in New York during the 85th National Convention, the elections were cancelled to prevent any candidate other than from Texas to be elected as president. In LULAC’s 89th history, no president from any other state or Puerto Rico other than from Texas have been elected as president to the National LULAC.
In brief: Luis Roberto Verá Jr. who was the election judge at the 85th National LULAC Convention in 2014 decided along with former termed-out National LULAC President Margaret Moran to cancel the elections because Rocha who was running for president in 2014 might not win. It was the first time, that a LULAC National Convention was ever canceled in 85 years. Verá argued that the elections were canceled because of a filed TRO in New York.
Verá was also the election judge at the Salt Lake City 86th National LULAC Convention as well. Verá should have recused himself for conflict of interest from the election, since Rocha was running again. Rocha, Verá and Moran had very close working ties.
Rocha received 385 votes and Magdalena “Maggie” Rivera from Illinois received 160 votes in 2015. In 2014, Rivera was elected President by the membership in NY, but Moran, Verá and Wilkes failed to recognize her election to office. Two lawsuits were filed in Texas and New York pertaining to 2014 elections. Apparently, Moran illegally stayed in office for a fifth term to prevent an outsider other than a candidate from Texas to take office as president of the National LULAC.
Rocha’s term will expire in July, if he remains in office. A National LULAC president can only run and get elected to four terms, according to its organization’s Constitution and by-laws.
Darryl Morin from Wisconsin, the former Midwest Vice-president of LULAC has announced that he is a candidate for president of the National LULAC, but if the National LULAC keeps its tradition from electing candidates from other states other than from Texas, Morin or any other candidate outside Texas will probably not succeed. Morin in 2014 resigned shortly after the cancelation of the annual elections, but later recinded his resignation after Moran convinced him to stay on to support her decision to stay 5th term as LULAC president.
Morin posted a Facebook video on his account that explained what actually happened in Washington, D.C. when the LULAC National Board met, the resignation of Wilkes and Morin also confirmed the “corruption of principle” by Rocha and his followers. Rocha has agreed to rescind the restraining order as long as the National Board backed away from removing him and let him serve his full term, including for Joe Henry, the National LULAC Vice-president of the Midwest to stop writing negative articles about Rocha. Rocha has endorsed Domingo Garcia, a Dallas, Texas attorney for National LULAC President, according to Morin. If Garcia is elected in July during the annual National Convention, he will definitely follow the long line of those elected before him that no outsider from Texas will get elected as LULAC National President confirming the long standing corruption within the National LULAC.
Garcia’s supporters have threaten Morin including other members at the National level and indicated for him to pull out from the race to become the next president at LULAC. Morin has confirmed that he is a candidate for president of the National LULAC.

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13 Russian Nationals Indicted By Feds For U.S. Elections Meddling

FBI counter intelligence investigation resulted with 13 Russian nationals charged for U.S. Election’s meddling.

By H. Nelson Goodson
Hispanic News Network U.S.A.

February 16, 2018

Washington, D.C. – On Friday, the Department of Justice in a press release announced that a grand jury in the District of Columbia returned an indictment by the Special Counsel’s Office charging thirteen Russian nationals and three Russian companies for committing federal crimes while seeking to interfere in the United States political system, including the 2016 Presidential election. President Donald Trump had claimed the allegations by feds that the Russians had meddle in the U.S. elections was a hoax, but the federal indictments indicate otherwise.
Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin, the Russian President says, the feds are conducting a witch-hunt, but the Russian indictments could tie Putin in a conspiracy to interfere with the elections in favor of Trump.
According to the indictments, the defendants allegedly conducted what they called “information warfare against the United States,” with the stated goal of “spread[ing] distrust towards the candidates and the political system in general.”
“This indictment serves as a reminder that people are not always who they appear to be on the Internet,” said Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein. “The indictment alleges that the Russian conspirators want to promote discord in the United States and undermine public confidence in democracy. We must not allow them to succeed. The Department of Justice will continue to work cooperatively with other law enforcement and intelligence agencies, and with the Congress, to defend our nation against similar current and future schemes. I want to thank the federal agents and prosecutors working on this case for their exceptional service.”According to the allegations in the indictment, twelve of the individual defendants worked at various times for Internet Research Agency LLC, a Russian company based in St. Petersburg, Russia. The other individual defendant, Yevgeniy Viktorovich Prigozhin, funded the conspiracy through companies known as Concord Management and Consulting LLC, Concord Catering, and many subsidiaries and affiliates. The conspiracy was part of a larger operation called “Project Lakhta.” Project Lakhta included multiple components, some involving domestic audiences within the Russian Federation and others targeting foreign audiences in multiple countries.
Internet Research Agency allegedly operated through Russian shell companies. It employed hundreds of persons for its online operations, ranging from creators of fictitious personas to technical and administrative support, with an annual budget of millions of dollars. Internet Research Agency was a structured organization headed by a management group and arranged in departments, including graphics, search-engine optimization, information technology, and finance departments. In 2014, the agency established a “translator project” to focus on the U.S. population. In July 2016, more than 80 employees were assigned to the translator project.

Two of the defendants allegedly traveled to the United States in 2014 to collect intelligence for their American political influence operations.
To hide the Russian origin of their activities, the defendants allegedly purchased space on computer servers located within the United States in order to set up a virtual private network. The defendants allegedly used that infrastructure to establish hundreds of accounts on social media networks such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, making it appear that the accounts were controlled by persons within the United States. They used stolen or fictitious American identities, fraudulent bank accounts, and false identification documents. The defendants posed as politically and socially active Americans, advocating for and against particular political candidates. They established social media pages and groups to communicate with unwitting Americans. They also purchased political advertisements on social media.
The Russians also recruited and paid real Americans to engage in political activities, promote political campaigns, and stage political rallies. The defendants and their co-conspirators pretended to be grassroots activists. According to the indictment, the Americans did not know that they were communicating with Russians.
After the election, the defendants allegedly staged rallies to support the President-elect while simultaneously staging rallies to protest his election. For example, the defendants organized one rally to support the President-elect and another rally to oppose him—both in New York, on the same day.
On September 13, 2017, soon after the news media reported that the Special Counsel’s Office was investigating evidence that Russian operatives had used social media to interfere in the 2016 election, one defendant allegedly wrote, “We had a slight crisis here at work: the FBI busted our activity…. So, I got preoccupied with covering tracks together with my colleagues.”
The indictment includes eight criminal counts. Count One alleges a criminal conspiracy to defraud the United States, by all of the defendants. The defendants allegedly conspired to defraud the United States by impairing the lawful functions of the Federal Election Commission, the U.S. Department of Justice, and the U.S. Department of State in administering federal requirements for disclosure of foreign involvement in certain domestic activities.
Count Two charges conspiracy to commit wire fraud and bank fraud by Internet Research Agency and two individual defendants.
Counts Three through Eight charge aggravated identity theft by Internet Research Agency and four individuals.
There is no allegation in the indictment that any American was a knowing participant in the alleged unlawful activity. There is no allegation in the indictment that the charged conduct altered the outcome of the 2016 election.

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Alfonso Morales Selected As The New Milwaukee Acting/Interim Chief of Police

Morales becomes the new Acting/Interim Chief of Police for the City of Milwaukee.

By H. Nelson Goodson
Hispanic News Network U.S.A.

February 15, 2018

Milwaukee, WI – On Thursday, the Milwaukee Fire and Police Commission Board selected Milwaukee Police Captain Alfonso Morales, 47, on a vote of 4-3 as the new Acting/Interim Chief of Police. Morales becomes the second Hispanic to become Chief of Police in the City of Milwaukee.
Morales is bilingual and speaks Spanish very well, which in 2013, he told Hispanic News Network U.S.A. (HNNUSA) during an interview that it has been an asset in communicating with the predominantly Hispanic population in Milwaukee. Morales is one of 10 siblings and his father is originally from the state of Michoacan.
He went to Milwaukee Trade and Technical High School from 1984 to 1988, in that same year he entered Carroll College and later received a Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal justice and Spanish. While attending high school, he met assist. football and baskeball Coach David Borowiscz who encouraged him to pursue a college degree. Morales credits Borowiscz for his success today and he also wants to encourage other teens to succeed as Borowiscz has done for him.
Morales has an impressive and honorable service record in the police department. He was an officer from 1993 to 1999, then was promoted to detective from 1999 to 2003 where he served in the homicide division, then became a Lieutenant in 2003, where served in several assignments that included the homicide division, internal affairs, training academy and the narcotics bureau.
Morales also worked with former detective partner, Lt. Timothy Heier at District 2 (Heier was later appointed Captain). Another highly recognized and respected supervisor at District 2 was Lt. Alexander Ramirez (Ramirez was appointed Captain in 2017 and is the commander at District 2). The Milwaukee Police District 2 Station has a history of making strives in community and police relations by preventing crime. Under Captain Morales’ leadership and experience, including the highly staffing of professional police personnel at District 2, it definately contributed in lowering crime statistics and provided a good working relation with the community it served and protects.
In May 2002, Morales was also instrumental in stopping a convicted murder felon from escaping during a trial at the Milwaukee Public Safety Building courtroom. Laron Anthony Ball, 20, was fatally shot by then Det. Morales after Ball attempted to escape from the courtroom moments into his convicted verdict. Ball jump from the box and tried to go through a window, but failed. He then jumped a Milwaukee deputy sheriff and while trying to disarm the deputy, the weapon fired shooting the deputy in the left leg. Ball also had bit another deputy. Det. Morales took out his service weapon and killed Ball.
Morales was hailed as a hero for preventing Ball from getting control of the deputy’s weapon to shoot his way out and possibly injurying other people in the courtroom during his dramatic attempted escape. Ball had just been convicted for felony murder and several counts of arm robbery charges, according to court records.
According to the Milwaukee Police Department website, Captain Morales was appointed to the Milwaukee Police Department in 1993. As an officer, Captain Morales was assigned to District Two and the Vice Control Division. In 1999, he was promoted to Detective and worked in the Criminal Investigation Bureau where he worked various assignments from burglaries to robberies to homicide. From 2003 until 2009, he served as Lieutenant in the Criminal Investigation Bureau where he managed the night shift Gang Crimes Unit and Homicide Unit. In 2010, he transitioned to the Patrol Bureau where he managed the detective decentralization project in District Three. He later worked assignments in Internal Affairs, the Police Academy, and HIDTA (High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas). From 2004 to 2013 he was the Crisis Negotiator Commander of MPD’s negotiators unit that responded to incidents involving barricaded armed subjects. In 2013, Captain Morales was promoted to the role of Commanding Officer of District Two, which encompasses part of Milwaukee’s South Side and is comprised of more than 87,000 residents. Captain Morales currently runs MPD’s Project Safe Neighborhood-High Value Target program, a department-wide initative designed to reduce violent crime by focusing enforcement efforts on some of the worst gun offenders in our community.
Captain Morales holds a Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice from Carroll University in Waukesha, has taken masters level classes at the FBI National Academy in Quantico, Virginia, and is a graduate of the Senior Management Institute for Police (SMIP).

The Latino community made history when Morales was selected as the first Chief of Police from Milwaukee since the 1970’s when Latino activists fought to remove the height requirement, which was discriminatory for Latinos who were barred from joining the police and fire departments because they were not tall enough as required. 
Former Chief Phillip Arreola was the first Latino Chief of Police in Milwaukee, but he was considered an outsider.
Brief history, in the early 1970’s only one Latino Police Officer was in the Milwaukee Police Department. The officer was Procopio Sandoval who retired as a Detective in 1993. The height requirement of 5′ 7″ (est. 1885) and 5′ 9″ for hiring a police officer under police Chief Harold A. Breier kept many Hispanics from being appointed as police officers by the Fire and Police Commission. 
Members of the Latino community led by Jesus Salas, Marla O. Anderson and others in the 1970’s protested the height requirement in front of Chief Breier’s office claiming it was discriminatory. The Fire and Police Commission height requirement kept most Hispanics from joining the police and fire department, which Salas and Anderson claimed it discriminated Latinos because of their height. The Hispanic community was being defranchised and unable to have members from the community appointed to the department in order to serve their community, according to the protesters. 
After several protests, the Commission lowered the height requirement, thus paving the way for Hispanics to join both the Milwaukee Fire and Police Departments. 

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